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College of Communication
Master of Arts in Communication
COURSE SYLLABUS
cOURSE tITLE
Seminar in Communication Technologies
Course Code
0800532
Fall Semester, 2018 / 2019

COURSE SYLLABUS
Course Title Seminar in Communication Technologies
Course Code 800532
Credit Hours 3
Pre-requisite(s) Co-requisite(s) Semester Fall Year 2018
Instructors Name Dr. Bouziane Zaid
Office Location W7 002
Tel. No. Email [email protected]
Lecture Times W 16:30-19:00
Office Hours UT: 11-12, MW 11-1:30, and by appointment
Course Description (as in the catalogue):
A review of historical trends of communication technology development. Analog and digital technology systems. Communication technology convergence. Publishing, broadcast and interactive technologies. Social and cultural implications of communication technologies. Privacy, freedom and national identity. Theoretical perspectives on communication technologies. Future prospects. Case studies.

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Course Objectives/Goals (optional):
The goals of this course are to enable students to:
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
Course Learning Outcomes:
By the end of successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Define the most important knowledge related to the field of communication technologies
2. Analyze and criticize the current issues of communication technologies both locally and globally
3. Master and apply critical skills in examining communication technology issues and problems in modern society
4. Understand the implication of recent communication technologies on media, culture and society
5. Practice a self-learning under the supervision of the faculty member by conducting a research project as part of his/her practical learning experience.
6. Develop a personal character based on independence, ethics, and understanding of communication technologies and its impact on culture and media
7. Understand ethics and the legal implications of media technologies in modern diverse world
Alignment of Course Student Learning Outcomes to Program Student Learning Outcomes
Program SLOs Course SLOs
Understand the concepts, functions,
and theories of mass and digital media,
their role in society, and history
1. Define the most important knowledge related to the field of communication technologies
4. Understand the implication of recent communication technologies on media, culture and society
Understand the meaning of media
social responsibility, professional
ethical practices, and laws that
organize mass media practice, and
principles and laws of freedom of
speech and press – and have an
interdisciplinary knowledge that links
media with social, cultural, economic and historical processes. 6. Develop a personal character based on independence, ethics, and understanding of communication technologies and its impact on culture and media
7. Understand ethics and the legal implications of media technologies in modern diverse world.

Acquire skills of critical thinking as
this relates to concepts, assumptions
and approaches to media and their
roles in modern diverse and global
society. 3. Master and apply critical skills in examining communication technology issues and problems in modern society.

Understand and apply research tools
and techniques in media research and
evaluation of media products.

5. Practice a self-learning under the supervision of the faculty member by conducting a research project as part of his/her practical learning experience.
Has the ability of use and synthesis
information and knowledge from a
variety of sources in media production
and research.

5. Practice a self-learning under the supervision of the faculty member by conducting a research project as part of his/her practical learning experience.
Master various forms of writing for
mass media such as news stories,
investigative reports, interviews,
commentaries, in addition to script
writing skills for radio and Television.

Use and operate radio and Television
equipment and studios and to master
videography, editing, and directing for radio and television.

Conduct communication research and
collect data via various methods and
being able to interpret data using basic
statistics
5. Practice a self-learning under the supervision of the faculty member by conducting a research project as part of his/her practical learning experience.
Prepare, design and produce various
newspapers and magazines using latest
desktop publishing softwares and
photojournalism skills, and produce
different media using the latest
graphics design and multimedia
softwares.

Work independently as well as part of
a team in various communication and
media settings
5. Practice a self-learning under the supervision of the faculty member by conducting a research project as part of his/her practical learning experience.
Be creative in designing and producing media contents that impact on the profession and the community.

Think critically, creatively, and independently, including the ability to critically evaluate own work and that of other. 3. Master and apply critical skills in examining communication technology issues and problems in modern society
demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of peoples and cultures and of the significance and impact of mass communications in a global society 4. Understand the implication of recent communication technologies on media, culture and society
Work independently in designing and implementing communication/media projects Apply knowledge and skills in real situations in the field through internship and other training settings Interact with professional colleagues in a team in a range of settings Appreciate the importance of leadership, team work and decision- making processes in media production. Exercise self evaluations in various educational settings and media practices Able to explore new ways of thinking and doings in a fast-changing media landscape locally and globally. Critically discuss and evaluate the role of ethical media practices in contemporary diverse environment 7. Understand ethics and the legal implications of media technologies in modern diverse world
Weekly Distribution of Course Topics/Contents
Week Topic Comments
Week 1: 02/09 Add & Drop week
Week 2: 09/09 Introduction to the course
Alhijiri New year Read the syllabus
Week 3: 16/09 Historical, contemporary, and future trajectory of technology https://www.netflix.com/watch/80241725?trackId=200257859Nye, D. (2012). “Not Just One Future” (Chapter 11) https://polifilosofie.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/technology-matters-questions-to-live-with-david-e-nye.pdf
Week 4: 23/09 The network society
Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUT4B3au5h4Week 5: 30/09 The network society
Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUT4B3au5h4Week 6: 07/10 Theories of technology and society
Hand out
One page Proposal due October 10
Week 7: 14/10 The online self (self-presentation & identity, reputation & credibility)
Alec Couros, “Identity in a digital world,” TEDxLangleyED: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAlIBTgYfDoChamorro-Premuzic, T. “How different are your online and offline personalities?”
https://www.theguardian.com/media-network/2015/sep/24/online-offline-personality-digital-identityWeek 8: 21/10 Mid-term exam October 24
Week 9: 30/10 Civic uses of technology
Bennett, L. W. (2008) “Changing Citizenship in the Digital Age.”
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/efed/dd453b762b9f87e7da0e2ca724fbde5b9323.pdfWeek 10: 04/11 Big data & society (algorithms & privacy)
Pasquale, F. (2015) The Black Box Society. Chapter. 2 Digital Reputation in an Era of Runaway Data. http://raley.english.ucsb.edu/wp-content/Engl800/Pasquale-blackbox.pdfWeek 11: 11/11 Memes & diffusion (spreadable & viral content)
Virtual worlds (games & augmented reality)
Guadagno et.al. “What makes a video go viral? An analysis of emotional contagion and Internet memes.” https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2dce/84f41a5217b75bca617b77243387ab06e3a4.pdfWeek 12: 18/11 Language & technology (Internet linguistics)
Copyright and intellectual property
Prophet Muhammad Birthday TBA
Week 13: 25/11 Digital divide
Martyr’s Day, Nov 30 Baron, N. S. (2009). “Are Digital Media Changing Language?”
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar09/vol66/num06/Are-Digital-Media-Changing-Language%C2%A2.aspxWeek 14: 03/12 Class presentations
UAE National, Day Dec. 2
TBA
Week 15: 09/12 Class presentations
Exam review Research paper due December 13
Week 16 FINAL EXAM
Students’ Assessment:
Students are assessed as follows:
Assessment Tool(s) Date Weight (%)
Attendance and participation Weekly 10%
Mid-term exam Oct. 24 10%
Reflection papers *3 Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20 10%
Presentation Dec. 5 and 12 10%
Research Paper Dec. 13 20%
Final exam Week 16 40%
Total 100%
Course Outcome Assessment Plan:
Course Los Teaching/Learning Method(s) Assessment Tool(s) Performance Indicators
1. Define the most important knowledge related to the field of communication technologies. Lecture and class discussions Reaction papers, Mid-term and final exams 2. Analyze and criticize the current issues of communication technologies both locally and globally. Lecture and class discussions 3. Master and apply critical skills in examining communication technology issues and problems in modern society. Lecture and class discussions Reaction papers, Mid-term and final exams 4. Understand the implication of recent communication technologies on media, culture and society. Lecture and class discussions Reaction papers, Mid-term and final exams 5. Practice a self-learning under the supervision of the faculty member by conducting a research project as part of his/her practical learning experience. Lecture and class discussions Reaction papers, Mid-term and final exams 6. Develop a personal character based on independence, ethics, and understanding of communication technologies and its impact on culture and media. Lecture and class discussions Reaction papers, Mid-term and final exams 7. Understand ethics and the legal implications of media technologies in modern diverse world. Lecture and class discussions Reaction papers, Mid-term and final exams Teaching and Learning Resources:
Required readings:
Historical, contemporary, and future trajectory of technology:
Nye, D. (2012). “Not Just One Future” (Chapter 11), in Technology Matters Questions to Live With.

https://polifilosofie.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/technology-matters-questions-to-live-with-david-e-nye.pdfNetwork society:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUT4B3au5h4Online Identity:
Alec Couros, “Identity in a digital world, TEDxLangleyED: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAlIBTgYfDoChamorro-Premuzic, T. (2015). “How different are your online and offline personalities?”
https://www.theguardian.com/media-network/2015/sep/24/online-offline-personality-digital-identityCivic uses of technology:
Bennett, L. W. (2008) “Civic uses of technology: Changing Citizenship in the Digital Age.”
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/efed/dd453b762b9f87e7da0e2ca724fbde5b9323.pdfBig data & society (algorithms & privacy):
Pasquale, F. (2015). The Black Box Society. Chapter. 2 Digital Reputation in an Era of Runaway Data.
http://raley.english.ucsb.edu/wp-content/Engl800/Pasquale-blackbox.pdfMemes & diffusion (spreadable & viral content):
Guadagno et.al. (2013). “What makes a video go viral? An analysis of emotional contagion and Internet memes.” https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2dce/84f41a5217b75bca617b77243387ab06e3a4.pdfLanguage & technology (Internet linguistics):
Baron, N. S. (2009). “Are Digital Media Changing Language?”
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar09/vol66/num06/Are-Digital-Media-Changing-Language%C2%A2.aspxRecommended Readings:
John Perry Barlow. A Framework for patents and copyrights in the digital age. (Everything you know about intellectual property is wrong.) https://www.wired.com/1994/03/economy-ideas/Grading Scale:
The minimum passing letter grade is C+. Letter grades shall be calculated as follows:
% Letters Grade Points
90-100 A 4
85-89 B+ 3.5
80-84 B 3
75-79 C+ 2.5
70-74 C 2
65-69 D+ 1.5
60-64 D 1
Below 60 F Zero
Attendance policy:
Attendance is compulsory. A student missing 10% (6 hours) of the total allocated course hours will receive 1st warning notice and a student missing 15% (9 hours) will receive 2nd warning notice. A student missing 20% (12 hours or more) will be forced to withdraw (in accordance with the university regulations).

Plagiarism/Cheating:
Students are expected to do their own work. You are allowed to work on assignments in teams only if specified by the instructor. In other words, students are encouraged to communicate about general principles of the course, but all assigned homework must be done on an individual basis. The instructor is available to provide any assistance that you may need. Cheating is considered a serious offense by the university. You should be aware of the severe penalty for cheating (refer to the student code of conduct published in the university catalogue).
Policy on mobile phones, tablets, and laptops:
All mobile phones, computers, tablets and other devices must be on silent or turned off and put away at all times when in the classroom; computers may only be used for specific course purposes during class time.

Description of the assignments:
Reflection Papers:
These are three 500-words papers. An “A” paper should integrate 2 main parts, the way they are described below:
You write an interpretive summary (1 page): you select some concept, idea, assumption, value, presupposition, whatever from one of the texts we will be discussing in class and present a brief summary of it. The point of this is to tell me how well you understand what the authors say.

You write a critique of what you have just finished summarizing (1 page): Your choice of the concept or idea indicates that you sensed something positive or negative about it. Write about how you could apply the concept/idea/theory, or about how they are inaccurate or inappropriate and needs alteration. You could also write about any connections you see between the concepts and your experience, or between the concepts and other concepts we’re studying or have studied in other courses.
Research Paper:
You will write one 12-15 pages (double-spaced, using a 12-point font with a 1-inch margin on all sides) analytical research paper on a topic of your choosing (subject to my approval). The topic should be one that we have explored in class. The topic of the paper can be anything related to media technologies, digital identities, the network society, big data, privacy and surveillance. You need to do the following:
1) formulate a research question,
2) conduct a preliminary literature review,
3) select appropriate theory
4) select appropriate methods
5) collect data,
6) write up findings and analysis
Please use APA style and include a page listing all your references. You are expected to use AT LEAST FIVE academic sources and to reference the course textbook. More details on the paper assignment will be discussed in class. The paper is due on Dec. 13.

Class Presentation
You will present your final research paper and engage the class in a discussion about the significance of your topic and your findings. You present the research question, the findings of the literature review, the theory and methodology you are using, the data analysis and findings of the research. (Duration: 7 minutes)
Exams: Both midterm and final exams consist of open ended essay questions prompting you to demonstrate facility with course concepts, and an ability to take supported stances on controversial/provocative problems related to the media technologies and their uses.
Grading criteria:
Based on two grading scales:
The first scale is based on a performance rubric related to the quality of the ideas, organization of the paper, ability to write to your target audience, etc. I will read your paper twice in order to gauge where you are on this scale. This scale and rubric are as follows:
A Exceptional: Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and exceptional skill or great originality in the use of those concepts and techniques in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course. (95+)
A- Excellent: Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with a high degree of skill and/or some elements of originality in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course. (90-94)
B+ Very Good: Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with a fairly high degree of skill in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course. (87-89)
B Good: Good level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with considerable skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. (83-86)
C+/B- Competent: Acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with considerable skill in using them to satisfy requirements of an assignment or course. (77-82)
C Fairly Competent: Acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with some skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. (73-76)
C- Passing: Slightly better than minimal knowledge of required concepts and/or techniques together with some skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. (70-72)
Once I have established the overall quality of the paper I then deduct points for poor execution: Spelling, grammar, syntax, unclear wording, phrases, etc. The deductions are based on the scale that has previously been established in the MCM program. It is as follows:
Category I (-1.0—1.5 each):
Wordiness (extra or unnecessary word, -2.5 points each)
Punctuation (in quotations, commas and periods should come before the “close quote.” For example:
“The period should come before the close quote,” she said. Correct
“The period should come before the close quote”, she said. Wrong
3) APA style issues in general (when applicable)
4) Any non-spelling grammar/mechanical (non-punctuation-related) mistake
Includes capitalization
5) Repetition/redundancy
6) Failure to vary sentence beginnings.

7) Referent/Descriptor problem: This involves using the where/when element in a misleading or inaccurate way. Examples:
No problem His Highness yesterday at the Dubai Police Officers Club praised nine retiring major generals for their hard work.

Referent/Descriptor problem His Highness praised nine retiring major generals for their hard work yesterday at the Dubai Police Officers Club.

The last example makes it sound as though the retiring major generals deserved praise for what they did yesterday at the club.

Category II (-2.5 each):
1) Extremely awkward or unclear wording
Includes failing to correct a quotation for clarity
2) The use of the passive voice
3) Failure to include first name (and descriptive title, if necessary) on first reference
4) Failure to write out acronyms on first reference
There may be a few instructor-set or AP-specified exceptions
5) Incomplete or run-on (lengthy) sentence
6) Transition needed
Category III (-5 each):
1) Factual error; i.e. Days / Dates / numbers, etc.

2) Missing source or citation
3) Misspelling of names / events /
4) Failure to reach the minimum number of pages assigned for the paper / project; and/or failing to match the required structure of any given format.

Category IV
Failing to cover assignment (failing to come to class for an exam– automatic 0)
Career-ending issues (Administrative Withdrawal with an F for the course)
Plagiarism/Academic Dishonesty

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Choose cite format:
College of Communication Master of Arts in Communication COURSE SYLLABUS cOURSE tITLE Seminar in Communication Technologies Course Code 0800532 Fall Semester. (2019, May 18). Retrieved January 18, 2021, from https://midwestcri.org/college-of-communication-master-of-arts-in-communication-course-syllabus-course-title-seminar-in-communication-technologies-course-code-0800532-fall-semester/

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